Union Free Trade Agreements

The EU negotiates trade agreements on behalf of member states, including Ireland. These agreements deal with preferential tariffs on the transport of goods between the EU and countries around the world. Since WTO members are required to communicate their free trade agreements to the secretariat, this database is based on the official source of information on free trade agreements (called the WTO-language regional trade agreement). The database allows users to obtain information on trade agreements that are communicated to the WTO by country or theme (goods, services or goods and services). This database provides users with an up-to-date list of all existing agreements, but those that are not notified to the WTO may be lacking. In addition, reports, tables and graphs containing statistics on these agreements, including preferential tariff analysis, are presented. [26] They have also evolved to cover a wider range of areas to facilitate trade. These include public procurement opportunities, business visas, mutual recognition of professional qualifications, product certification, intellectual property rights and cross-border trade in services. Modern EU free trade agreements want to do more than reduce tariffs. In addition, they aim to improve market access by removing non-tariff barriers (for example.

B, regulatory cooperation), liberalizing trade in services and opening markets to public procurement. These agreements go far beyond the scope of the WTO. These include competition rules, access to foreign direct investment and rules guaranteeing sustainability (employment and the environment). The EU is working to modernise previous agreements with Chile and Mexico, which contain only fundamental economic aspects. Free trade agreements, which are free trade zones, are generally outside the scope of the multilateral trading system. However, WTO members must inform the secretariat when new free trade agreements are concluded and, in principle, the texts of free trade agreements are reviewed by the Committee on Regional Trade Agreements. [11] Although a dispute in free trade areas is not the subject of litigation within the WTO`s dispute resolution body, “there is no assurance that WTO panels will comply and reject jurisdiction in a particular case.” [12] The European Court of Justice has ruled that the provisions relating to arbitration between investor countries (including a special court under some free trade agreements) fall within the shared jurisdiction between the European Union and its Member States and that, for this reason, their ratification should be authorised by the EU and each of the 28 Member States. [82] These large-scale agreements can be negotiated in detail for several years.

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